Emergency Hotline:

402.554.7777

24 hours a day / 7 days a week


What is an Emergency?

Gas leaks, odor of gas, damaged lines, carbon monoxide symptoms, water main breaks or no water service are all considered emergencies.

If you smell gas, do not attempt to locate the leak. Instead, leave the house or building right away. Do not use any electrical switches, appliances, lights, telephones, or mobile devices, as an electrical charge could create a spark. When you are in a safe place, call M.U.D.'s emergency hotline at 402.554.7777 or 9-1-1.

If someone is showing symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, call 9-1-1 immediately. Symptoms are like the flu.

If you have a water-related emergency, call 402.554.7777. Our personnel are ready to assist you 24/7. When in doubt, call us immediately.

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EMERGENCY (EMERGENCIA)

Cyber Security

By Jeff Breci,
Director of Information Security - 

October is Cyber Security Awareness Month, a time to reflect on what we are doing while using any computing device. We are going to share with you some sites that promote online awareness, security and insight.

Stop Think Connect is a good starting point and the name of the site is a reminder to think about what you are doing while online. The message is simple - stop and think before you connect. Beyond clicking on links, be careful if you connect to free Wi-Fi hotspots. It is free for a reason and usually trivial for someone to be watching what you are doing online.

The Cyberaware Securing the Human website contains a variety of free awareness videos, links and articles. Topics here range from security terms, tips for kids and teens, to protecting your computing devices.

Scholastic has some good basic ideas for keeping your kids safe online. There are a number of articles and links from that site that cover a variety of online safety topics.

If you want some details about a variety of security incidents and issues, along with some of the workings of the shadier side of the internet, visit Brian Kreb’s site. Brian’s site also contains some general recommendations for a safer computing environment.

To wrap things up we have reminders you may have heard before. Ensure you are using a supported operating system. Keep your operating system and application software updated with all security patches, secure your home wireless network and do not open email attachments that are not expected. Lastly, remember if an email sounds too good to be true or seems suspicious, it probably is. FTC scam alerts and the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center are good resources for some of this information.